lang="en-US"UTF-8 John Mathey, Author at Prosig Support Blog class="archive author author-john author-19 custom-background custom-background-image group-blog blogolife-3_0_7 unknown"

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John Mathey graduated with a MS degree from the University of Toledo in 1972. John has over 35 years of experience with instrumentation, measurement, and analysis. Twenty-five of those years were spent at Ford Motor Company solving and providing training for vehicle noise, vibration, and harshness (NVH) issues. He is now a technical specialist at Prosig USA, Inc. where he provides technical support to Prosig customers in the U.S.A.

John Mathey graduated with a MS degree from the University of Toledo in 1972. John has over 35 years of experience with instrumentation, measurement, and analysis. Twenty-five of those years were spent at Ford Motor Company solving and providing training for vehicle noise, vibration, and harshness (NVH) issues. He is now a technical specialist at Prosig USA, Inc. where he provides technical support to Prosig customers in the U.S.A.

3277class="post-3277 post type-post status-publish format-standard hentry category-dats category-signal-processing category-tutorial tag-background-noise tag-gaussian tag-measure tag-measurement tag-noise tag-random tag-sine-wave tag-spectra tag-spectrum tag-spectrum-level tag-vibration"

Relative signal levels of a sinusoid with and without background noise

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In the process of looking at some order data, a question about the accuracy of the measurement of the signal level of discrete frequency signals which were close to the general noise level.  To answer this question, a small DATS worksheet was created which generated 2 signals.  The first signal was a 35 Hz sinusoid which, by itself the spectrum level was measured to be approximately -9 dB (ref 1 V) as seen in Figure 1.

Spectrum level of 35Hz sinusoid
Fig 1: Spectrum level of 35Hz sinusoid

Continue reading Relative signal levels of a sinusoid with and without background noise

John MatheyAdd a Comment3330class="post-3330 post type-post status-publish format-standard hentry category-dats category-p8000 category-tutorial tag-acquisition tag-calculated-channel tag-data-acquisition tag-data-capture tag-dats tag-hardware tag-non-linear tag-p8000 tag-polynomial tag-software tag-thermocouple"

Creating calculated signals with DATS Acquisition

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Case Study: What can I do if the transducer I am using has a non-linear sensitivity over its measuring range?

Abstract

Recently a PROSIG user wanted to measure a specific temperature parameter on a running engine. The transducer being used was one of the engine sensors built into the engine operating system to minimize engine emissions and maximize fuel economy. Unfortunately, the sensitivity of this transducer was not constant over the desired temperature range. The question then became, how can the output from this non-linear transducer be used to accurately measure the desired temperature parameter? Continue reading Creating calculated signals with DATS Acquisition

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