James Wren is an Application Engineer and the Sales Manager for Prosig Limited. James graduated from Portsmouth University in 2001, with a Masters degree in Electronic Engineering. He is a member of the Institution of Engineering and Technology. He has been involved with motorsport from a very early age with special interest in data acquisition. James is a founder member of the Dalmeny Racing team.

What is waterfall frequency spacing? And how does the DATS parameter ‘Requested Frequency Spacing’ work?

Let us try to understand what waterfall frequency spacing is. Waterfall frequency spacing is the gap between spectral lines in an FFT plot.

For example, if you had an analysis frequency of 0Hz to 100Hz and 100 spectral lines, then Frequency Spacing is 1Hz.

So why is there a ‘Requested Frequency Spacing’ and an ‘Actual Frequency Spacing’? Continue reading What is waterfall frequency spacing? And how does the DATS parameter ‘Requested Frequency Spacing’ work?

What Sample Rate Do I Use To Measure Whole Body Vibration?

What sample rate should I use if I am measuring whole body vibration?

Strict ISO8041 compliance imposes a minimum sample rate of 900 samples per second. This ensures the amplitude and phase characteristics of the applied weightings meet the required criteria. To take account of the anti alias hardware filter we would recommend 1200 samples/second. If non-strict compliance is used the minimum sample rate is 300 samples/second.

ISO2631-1 recommends a minimum data duration of 227 seconds. However, for greater reliability, 600 seconds is now considered essential. That is, a 600 second or longer signal will be more representative and will provide better quality results.

Relative signal levels of a sinusoid with and without background noise

In the process of looking at some order data, a question about the accuracy of the measurement of the signal level of discrete frequency signals which were close to the general noise level.  To answer this question, a small DATS worksheet was created which generated 2 signals.  The first signal was a 35 Hz sinusoid which, by itself the spectrum level was measured to be approximately -9 dB (ref 1 V) as seen in Figure 1.

Spectrum level of 35Hz sinusoid
Fig 1: Spectrum level of 35Hz sinusoid

Continue reading Relative signal levels of a sinusoid with and without background noise