James Wren is an Application Engineer and the Sales Manager for Prosig Limited. James graduated from Portsmouth University in 2001, with a Masters degree in Electronic Engineering. He is a Chartered Engineer and a registered Eur Ing. He has been involved with motorsport from a very early age with special interest in data acquisition. James is a founder member of the Dalmeny Racing team.

James Wren is an Application Engineer and the Sales Manager for Prosig Limited. James graduated from Portsmouth University in 2001, with a Masters degree in Electronic Engineering. He is a Chartered Engineer and a registered Eur Ing. He has been involved with motorsport from a very early age with special interest in data acquisition. James is a founder member of the Dalmeny Racing team.

Calibrating an Accelerometer with a Prosig P5000 system

Here we look at how to calibrate an accelerometer using a Prosig P5000 system.

Put the wax on the shaker top. Place the accelerometer in the axis you wish to calibrate with positive up and cable connected to P5000 with the relevant transducer class chosen.

Accelerometer calibration screen
Accelerometer calibration screen

Go to Single Channel Calibration screen.

Click on the Tone tab.

With P5000 armed turn on the shaker and monitor the sine wave on the real-time monitor and check Signal Quality as being GOOD.

With a GOOD sine wave click the Calculate button. It is recommended to click Calculate three times.

Check to see the Sensitivity change from what was originally entered when setting up the channel transducer information to the new calculated value. The calculated value should be close to the original.

DC Cal Offset is for DC level accelerometers.

Requested Excitation is for non IEPE (ICP) accelerometers such as capacitive.

After calculating the new sensitivity click on the Use button to make the change in the Transducer Sensitivity Acquisition Setup file.

NOTE: To achieve a GOOD signal reading place the shaker on a flat surface and avoid touching during operation. Make sure the surface the shaker is sitting on does not come in contact with other sources of vibrations or electrical conductance.

Prosig DAC Signal Generation and Reproduction

Using a Prosig P8000 system with a 8424 DAC (digital-to-analogue) card fitted, it is possible to generate signals of any type. Typically, these might be  sinewaves, chirps, random, bursts, sweeps or anything else that you can think of.

With a maximum bandwidth of 19.2kHz for each and every output, the 8424 DAC card offers the highest quality reproduction of either real time generated signals or replayed signals at sample rates of up to 288kHz.

The high sample rate to bandwidth ratio ensures that any signals generated or replayed up to 19.2kHz are reproduced in extremely high quality with little or no distortion.

Find out more about….

Prosig P8000 system

8424 DAC (digital-to-analogue) card

How do I balance a shaft?

“How do I balance a shaft?” seems like a fairly straightforward question, but there are a number of things that we need to understand first. Here we look at a number of key concepts that need to be understood in order perform balancing.

What does balance mean?

Well broadly speaking to balance a shaft, mass must be added or removed at certain angles. The concept being that the centre of gravity and rotational centre of the shaft will be equal when the shaft is balanced. Continue reading How do I balance a shaft?